IRS

2019 Annual Contribution Limit Increase for Retirement Plans

This week the IRS announced increases to the annual contribution limits for 401(k) and IRA accounts, effective January 1, 2019.   Both limits increased by $500, so the new annual contribution limit is $19,000 for 401(k) plan accounts and $6,000 for IRA’s.

For detail on what else changed see the IRS news release here.

By |November 5th, 2018|Categories: Individual Tax, IRS, Retirement Planning|Comments Off on 2019 Annual Contribution Limit Increase for Retirement Plans

IRS Clarifies Rules Regarding When Rental Property Activity Should be Reported as a Schedule Business

According to the IRS, not all rental property activity should be reported on Schedule E.   If the property owner provides “substantial services” to short-term renters, the IRS says that the rental activity should be reported on Schedule C, and that the property owner must pay self-employment taxes on the income.   If there is a loss, it can be fully deducted without regard for the passive loss limitation rules.   Substantial services are defined by the IRS as:   regular cleaning, changing linens, or maid services…furnishing of utilities or cleaning of public areas do not count as substantial services.  For example, if you rent out a room in your house on Airbnb to short-term renters, the “substantial service” requirement can be satisfied if you are cleaning and changing linens after each short-term […]

By |September 15th, 2018|Categories: Business Tax, Individual Tax, IRS, Real Estate|Comments Off on IRS Clarifies Rules Regarding When Rental Property Activity Should be Reported as a Schedule Business

Final regulations regarding substantiation for charitable contributions

On July 30th 2018 the IRS issued final regulations relating to the substantiation and reporting requirements for charitable contributions which address substantiation requirements for contributions of more than $500 and of clothing and household items.

In order to substantiate a charitable contribution the following substantiation requirements must be met:

Cash Contributions

Under $250

  • Bank record or written communication from the charity
    • Blank pledge cards provided by the donee organization are not sufficient substantiation

$250 or more

  • Obtain contemporaneous written acknowledgement from the donee organization

 Non-cash Contributions

Donated property must be in good condition or better.

Under $250

  • Obtain a receipt or keep reliable records
    • Reliable records must show the following information:
      • Name and address of the donee
      • Date of the contribution
      • Description of the property in sufficient detail including the condition
      • Fair market value on the […]
By |August 10th, 2018|Categories: Accounting & Bookkeeping, Individual Tax, IRS, Nonprofit Organizations|Comments Off on Final regulations regarding substantiation for charitable contributions

Deferral of Stock Options or RSU Income Available Under the Tax Act of 12/22/2017

In the past, non-statutory stock options (non-ISOs or ESPPs) and restricted stock grants/RSUs were considered taxable income at FMV at exercise/vesting, potentially creating a tax problem for an employee of a privately held company, as there would be no avenue for selling some of the shares to cover the related tax liability.   Starting in 2018, a qualified employee of a qualified company can postpone recognition of that income for up to 5 years, but no later than an occurrence of a triggering event (e.g. an IPO).  The newly introduced Section 83(i) of the Internal Revenue Code provides guidance.

For more details click here.

By |June 29th, 2018|Categories: Accounting & Bookkeeping, Business Tax, Individual Tax, IRS|Comments Off on Deferral of Stock Options or RSU Income Available Under the Tax Act of 12/22/2017

California Supreme Court Ruling Significantly Limits Independent Contractor Classification

The California Supreme Court has established new criteria for classifying workers as Independent contractors.   In Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court, the Court rejected the previous multi-factor test and instead issued a rigid 3-factor test, called the “ABC” test.

Under the ABC test, each of the following three factors must be met in order to classify a worker as an independent contractor:

  1. The worker must be free from the control and direction of the hiring company in performing the work.
  2. The work must take place outside the usual course of the business of the hiring company’s business.
  3. The worker is customarily engaged in an independent established trade, occupation or business.

This ruling will no doubt have a significant impact on gig companies in the Bay Area (Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash, etc.), […]

By |June 6th, 2018|Categories: Accounting & Bookkeeping, Announcements, Business Operations, Business Tax, Individual Tax, IRS, Real Estate, Retirement Planning|Comments Off on California Supreme Court Ruling Significantly Limits Independent Contractor Classification